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Recent Press Cov­er­age for Mr. Peanut

  • Lit­er­ary Minded @ Crikey

    April 26, 2011
    Guest review: Alice Grundy on Mr Peanut by Adam Ross

  • The West Australian

    Feb­ru­ary 21, 2011
    Suf­fer­ing a fatal allergy to mar­riage

  • The Courier Mail

    Feb­ru­ary 19, 2011
    Adam Ross’s Mr Peanut scares hor­ror guru Steven King

  • Mil­wau­kee Wis­con­sin Journal-Sentinel

    Decem­ber 25, 2010
    Plots cap­ture the top 10 list: 2010 favorites offer intrigu­ing crimes, com­plex characters

  • Three Guys One Book

    Decem­ber 23, 2010
    Two Girls and a Peanut, the Best I’ve Read

  • The New Republic

    Decem­ber 22, 2010
    Edi­tors’ Picks: Best Books of 2010

  • The Philadel­phia Inquirer

    Decem­ber 19, 2010
    Earned a spot in the notable books for 2010… Read More

  • New Under­ground

    Decem­ber 15, 2010
    A ter­mi­nal degree and pro­fes­so­r­ial praise from a noted uni­ver­sity usu­ally guar­an­tee the recip­i­ent a run­ning start at a suc­cess­ful career. Not so in at least one venue, where rejec­tion and fail­ure is the norm: cre­ative writ­ing. For fic­tion writ­ers… Read More

  • Econ­o­mist

    Decem­ber 2, 2010
    Books of the Year 2010 Read More

  • Book Lady

    Decem­ber 6, 2010
    The Book Lady’s Best of 2010 Read More

  • Book­Page

    Decem­ber 7, 2010
    Best Books of 2010 Read More

  • New Yorker

    Decem­ber 13, 2010
    New Yorker Reviewer’s Favorites 2010 Read More

  • New York Times

    Novem­ber 24, 2010
    100 Notable Books of 2010 Read More

  • Annis­ton Star

    Sep­tem­ber 9, 2010
    This first novel from Adam Ross is so many things that it is dif­fi­cult to find a start­ing point for talk­ing about it. It is a police procedural—occasionally… Read More

  • Econ­o­mist

    August 12, 2010
    There is a per­verse romance to Adam Ross’s debut novel, Mr Peanut. This is a book about love. Or, rather, it’s about how love’s honey glow dims with time… Read More

  • Philadel­phia Inquirer

    August 1, 2010
    This is a beau­ti­fully writ­ten, bril­liant, extremely clever, major work… Read More

  • Edmon­ton Journal

    July 23rd, 2010
    Mr. Peanut is a tour de force of lit­er­ary games­man­ship which never takes itself too seriously—despite its incor­po­ra­tion of meta­tex­tual devices, it still pro­vides a very sat­is­fy­ing read­ing expe­ri­ence… Read More

  • Dal­las Morn­ing News

    July 18th, 2010
    As any avid book-lover can attest, one of the great­est sat­is­fac­tions of read­ing lies in dis­cov­er­ing an author whose voice is so dis­tinct and vivid that you truly can’t find any com­par­i­son. Such is the case with Adam Ross and his debut novel, Mr. PeanutRead More

  • Guardian

    July 18th, 2010
    an ambi­tious and well-crafted noir that man­ages to human­ize its char­ac­ters while fash­ion­ing their sto­ries into a grip­ping page-turner… Read More

  • Alabama Local News

    July 18th, 2010
    Stu­dents of cin­ema, really obser­vant stu­dents of cin­ema, may remem­ber Adam Ross from a pre­vi­ous career… Read More

  • WYPL’s Book Talk

    July 17th, 2010
    Stephen Usery inter­views Nashvil­lian Adam Ross about his debut novel Mr. Peanut (audio). Read More

  • Kansas City Star

    July 14th, 2010
    Adam Ross’ debut novel Mr. Peanut tells the story of David Pepin, a suc­cess­ful New York City video game designer who may or may not have killed his wife, who’s being inves­ti­gated by two detec­tives… Read More

  • New Yorker

    July 14th, 2010
    Obe­sity, mul­ti­ple mis­car­riages, homi­ci­dal fan­tasies and death by peanut are just a few of the prob­lems fac­ing David and Alice Pepin, the ill-fated cou­ple at the cen­ter of Adam Ross’s darkly clever début novel, Mr. PeanutRead More

  • WNYC

    July 14th, 2010
    Adam Ross dis­cusses his novel, Mr. Peanut (audio).Read More

  • Mem­phis Flyer

    July 8th, 2010
    David Pepin has killed his wife, Alice. Or maybe she finally offed her­self after suf­fer­ing through the many years of their dis­tressed mar­riage… Read More

  • wowOwow.com

    July 6th, 2010
    Can­dice Bergen, What book are you rec­om­mend­ing this sum­mer?Read More

  • Cleveland.com

    July 5th, 2010
    The mod­ern Amer­i­can philoso­pher Chris Rock has observed that if you’ve never con­tem­plated mur­der — in great, gory detail—you’ve never really been in love…Read More

  • chapter16.org
    July 2nd, 2010
    On Tues­day, in the fourth stop on his book tour in sup­port of Mr. Peanut, Adam Ross landed at the leg­endary Square Books in Oxford, Mississippi—arguably the Holy Land of South­ern Lit­er­a­ture… Read More
  • SquareBooks.com

    June 30th, 2010
    In a much-anticipated appear­ance yes­ter­day evening— June 29, 2010—Adam Ross read from his first novel, Mr. Peanut, just two days after it had received a front-cover rave from Scott Turow… Read More

  • HeraldTribune.com

    June 30th, 2010
    From cheesy episodes of “CSI” to the intel­lec­tual grandeur of Shake­speare, mur­der­ing a sig­nif­i­cant other is one of the most com­pelling plot lines that can be brought to any story…Read More

  • Pitts­burgh Tri­bune Review

    June 27th, 2010
    Like most nov­els, “Mr. Peanut” started with a sin­gle thread of a story…Read More

  • Chap­ter 16

    June 27th, 2010
    The book’s been out only a week, but already it might be time for review­ers to invest in a the­saurus. Adam Ross’s debut novel, Mr. Peanut, is inspir­ing the same adjec­tives again and again: “chal­leng­ing,” “inge­nious,” “bril­liant,” “riv­et­ing,” and the sur­pris­ingly recur­rent… Read More

  • Big Think

    June 27th, 2010
    In Scott Turow’s Times Book Review cover piece on Adam Ross’s novel, Mr. Peanut, he recalls the time a revered Stan­ford writ­ing pro­fes­sor cau­tioned stu­dents against writ­ing about mar­riage, “the most com­plex and fre­quently unfath­omable of human rela­tion­ships.” If this analy­sis is true—or, as this is true—why do we find writ­ers drawn… Read More

  • Pitts­burgh Tribune-Review

    June 27th, 2010
    Like most nov­els, Mr. Peanut started with a sin­gle thread of a story. But the tale Adam Ross heard from his father—about a cousin who was over­weight, aller­gic to peanuts… Read More

  • Hous­ton Chronicle

    June 27th, 2010
    Mar­riage is the most com­plex of human rela­tion­ships, bound as it is to sit­u­a­tions and emo­tions that are, to put it mildly, intense. Mar­riage com­bines love, sex, faith, finances, devo­tion, anger, fear and self-worth… Read More

  • Win­nipeg Free Press

    June 26th, 2010
    Amer­i­can writer Adam Ross’s auda­ciously assured first novel cen­tres on David Pepin, a video-game designer who may or may not have killed his wife, Alice… Read More

  • Madi­son County Herald

    June 26th, 2010
    After read­ing Adam Ross’ deli­ciously dark Mr. Peanut, one might con­sider stay­ing as far away from the sanc­tity of mat­ri­mony as pos­si­ble. Told from the per­spec­tives of one cou­ple and two detec­tives… Read More

  • Guardian

    June 25th, 2010
    This first novel by Adam Ross, a New York-born, Nashville-based writer, has gen­er­ated a lot of buzz in the US pub­lish­ing world and comes with endorse­ments from Richard Russo and Stephen King… Read More

    New York Times

    June 25th, 2010
    “When David Pepin first dreamed of killing his wife, he didn’t kill her him­self. He dreamed con­ve­nient acts of God.” So begins “Mr. Peanut,” the dar­ing, arrest­ing first novel by Adam Ross, an author of prodi­gious tal­ent, which takes as its theme “the dual nature of mar­riage, the prox­im­ity of vio­lence and love.” Read More

  • New York Times Paper Cuts blog

    June 25th, 2010
    Stray Ques­tions for: Adam Ross Read More

  • East Hamp­ton Star

    June 24th, 2010
    This excit­ing and strangely mov­ing debut novel has been touted by its pub­lisher as a “police pro­ce­dural of the soul.” That’s only one of many ways in which Mr. Peanut can be described…Read More

  • Pow­ells Books

    June 23nd, 2010
    Adam Ross answers the Powell’s Q&A Read More

  • New York Times

    June 22nd, 2010
    [Ross is] a sor­cerer with words, whose David Fos­ter Wallace-like descrip­tive pow­ers have given him the abil­ity to con­jure every­thing from a pretty Hawai­ian beach­scape to the slow-motion hor­ror of a car acci­dent with color and élan. Read More

  • Chap­ter 16

    June 22nd, 2010
    With Mr. Peanut, Nashville author Adam Ross trans­forms the crime genre into a sear­ing med­i­ta­tion on the haz­ards of mar­riage. Read More

  • NPR

    June 18th, 2010
    Don’t be fooled by the cute title — it’s a dark tale of love, hate, mur­der and mar­riage: a clev­erly writ­ten, struc­turally com­plex nar­ra­tive with char­ac­ters whose lives inter­lock.. Read More

    Nashville Scene

    June 17th, 2010
    Call it the Blurb Heard Round the World. Read­ers of Enter­tain­ment Weekly opened the Mar. 11 issue and found a cap­sule piece with the grab­ber head­line “Stephen King: What I’m Read­ing Now.” In it the dean of hor­ror… Read More

  • Huff­in­g­ton Post

    June 16st, 2010
    Sum­mer Read­ing: Indie Book­sellers Pick 15 Great New Beach Reads (Poll)… Read More

  • Aes­thet­ica Mag­a­zine (PDF)

    June 1st, 2010
    …an elab­o­rate study of mar­riage with a struc­ture that mir­rors the qual­i­ties of a Möbius strip and lay­ers of nar­ra­tive that echo the twisted per­spec­tive of an Escher print.
    Down­load

  • Harper’s (PDF)

    June 1st, 2010
    Mr. Peanut crack­les with life… Down­load

  • Lit­er­ary Review (PDF)

    June 1st, 2010
    The emo­tional lan­guage and per­cep­tions of Mr. Peanut are extra­or­di­nary… Down­load

  • The Word mag­a­zine (PDF)

    June 1st, 2010
    How close is mar­riage to mur­der? An excep­tional debut says those domestic-crime fig­ures don’t lie.
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  • Knopf­Dou­ble­day

    June 1st, 2010
    What fol­lows is a let­ter by Knopf edi­tor Gary Fisketjon on Adam Ross’s forth­com­ing debut novel, Mr. PeanutRead More

  • Wall Street Journal

    May 28th, 2010
    The three anti­heroes of this first novel con­tem­plate mur­der­ing their wives, or per­haps they have already mur­dered them—until the end you’re not sure…Read More

  • Book­list (PDF)

    May 1st, 2010
    In this pow­er­ful first novel, which has gar­nered plenty of pre­pub buzz, Ross deliv­ers one scorch­ing scene after another show­ing the dark side of mar­riage… Down­load

  • Publisher’s Weekly

    Apr 05, 2010
    Ross’s inspired debut explores the “prox­im­ity of vio­lence and love” and begins with the death of Alice Pepin, whose life­long strug­gle with depres­sion, inse­cu­rity, and obe­sity comes to an abrupt end at her kitchen table when… Read More

  • Kirkus Reviews (PDF)

    April 1st, 2010
    The buzz has been build­ing for a year about this debut novel by Nashville writer Ross, and it turns out it’s one of those rare cases where the word-of-mouth is valid. The book that’s been giv­ing Stephen King night­mares is a Möbius strip of a novel… Down­load

  • The Book­seller (PDF)

    March 12th, 2010
    Adam Ross’ debut is extremely accom­plished and refresh­ingly cliche-free, with agreat first line: “When David Pepin first dreamed of killing his wife, he didn’t kill her him­self… Down­load

  • Enter­tain­ment Weekly

    Mar 12, 2010
    Stephen King: What I’m Read­ing Now… Read More

  • Chapter16.org

    Mar 11, 2010
    Look­ing back, it’s pos­si­ble to argue that Adam Ross’s luck started with an old house in Leiper’s Fork. One after­noon, work­ing as special-projects edi­tor of the Nashville Scene, Ross went with his wife Beth to scout out…Read More

  • Three Guys One Book

    March 8th, 2010
    There seems to be a kind of wild kinetic energy to Mr. Peanut, the debut novel com­ing this sum­mer from Knopf. The author, Adam.html” Ross is no where to be seen in these pages… Read More

  • Nashville Scene

    March 5th, 2010
    This sum­mer, we’ll be say­ing we all knew Adam Ross back when he was the Scene’s much-abused, overqual­i­fied guy at the front desk. … Read More

  • Bookdwarf

    March 4th, 2010
    Adam Ross’ Mr. Peanut might be the best book I’ve read so far in 2010. In fact, it might be one of the best books of the year… Read More

  • Publisher’s Weekly

    Jan­u­ary 25th, 2010
    As usual, we high­light 10 promis­ing fic­tion debuts for our sea­sonal announce­ment issue… Down­load